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Trees and hedges

High hedges

Part 8 of the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 gives local authorities powers to deal with complaints by neighbours in relation to high hedges. A complaint may be made by the owner or occupier of a domestic property on the grounds that his or her reasonable enjoyment of the property is being adversely affected by the height of a hedge situated on land owned or occupied by another person. A complaint must be made to the local authority in whose area the land on which the hedge is situated lies. A high hedge is something that is a barrier to light formed wholly or predominantly by a line of two or more evergreens and rises to a height of more than two metres above ground level (s66). Local authorities are given powers to require the hedge to be cut back to two metres where their neighbours reasonable enjoyment of their property is being adversely affected by the height of the hedge. There is a novel requirement to attempt negotiation first (s68).

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